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Through the Eyes of Formula 1

Through the Eyes of Formula 1


This is such a good idea - drivers and team members from up and down the pit lane were given cameras and told to photograph things that meant something to them. The result is a eclectic mix of pictures. There are some great photos taken during Grand Prix weekends; I especially like Lewis Hamilton's shot of his view from the cockpit of his car. There are some stunning landscapes too. Kamui Kobayashi might consider a second career as a photographer; his picture of Mount Fuji is breathtaking. There's also a few unusual choices scattered throughout the book - who knew Damon Hill was so into surfing? It's good to see some devotion to dogs in evidence here too. It's not surprising that Mark Webber loves going home to his two gorgeous dogs, and Sergio Perez's hound is a joyous sight!

I think this is an excellent Christmas present idea for F1 fans. The photos all have little captions explaining why the person chose that particular shot, and the book is a who's who of the great and good of modern F1. And if the fun concept and revealing photos weren't reason enough to buy the book, the proceeds from it go to the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children's Charity. Splendid.

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